[Reception] Still, Life Singapore

This group show presents a collection of drawings and paintings exploring techniques and aesthetics of Classical western still-life, with objects, themes, and myths grown from the varied ancestries of Singaporean life.

Reception

Event Ended

Address

50 Genting Lane, #03-02 Cideco Industrial Complex, Singapore 349558

Opening Hours

Mon to Fri 11am – 7pm Sat (available by appointment only) Closed on Sun and PH

Admission Fees

Free

WebsiteEmail+65 6741 6366

About

This group show presents a collection of drawings and paintings exploring techniques and aesthetics of Classical western still-life, with objects, themes, and myths grown from the varied ancestries of Singaporean life. The works rethinks post-colonial sentiments with local cultures; they reflect on themes of conflicts, consumption, customs, and habits; and, explore relationships between objects, persons and places. Sara Chong’s works considers the permeable relationship between personhood and their environment. She describes, “We drink to slip into our own skin — be it alcohol, caffeine or water — when we drink, we seek to become more of ourselves, to modify and alter our chemistry; it is an act of solvency, to absolve, to solve, to find a solution. We drink to dilute and concentrate in response to the world around us. It is this act and our relationship with the vessels of our rituals that I try to discover and express through the mixing of my favorite solvent, oil — which, in itself is a reflection of what we are — liquid, organic chemistry.” Alvin Mark Tan’s paintings are studies of heritage and cultural objects that juxtaposes activity and stasis. Through this series entitled Take a Break, he asks his audience, “Do we work to live or live to work?” These images stand as a stable resting-place for the over-active mind that remind us that we all need to rest once in a while. The fragile relationship between mortality and permanence featured in Keyon Guo’s works, through the interactions between progress and sentimentality, in an ever-changing environment that he lives in. Regret Less is a series of 3 paintings that visually explores polysemy. Polysemy is an aspect of semantic ambiguity that is related to the multiplicity of word meanings. Meanings (and even purpose) of certain words can easily become distorted with the usage of different contexts. His works seek to evoke and explore feelings derived from this ambiguity. Yanyun Chen’s Hills of White Elephants shine a misty light on the tension between family identity and everyday conflict, through a reading of Ernest Hemingway’s text of a similar name. Recognizable China are visually inseparable and suspended; multiple thoughts and decisions are hanging like clouds; weathered, patterned surfaces seen through a fog. The triptych belongs to each other, yet stands as individuals. They reflect on our personhood alongside our family unit. These drawings are also a play on the artist’s name; and it is through our name–the act of being named–that we are bound to our families. [ Opening Reception ] Friday, 31 August 6pm – 9pm —Exhibition runs from 31 August to 28 September 2018—

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